Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving is being crucified in the press for being a disgruntled NBA player who is selfishly clinging to a purportedly unscientific viewpoint on the Covid vaccines. The Nets star, who has famously held heterodox views such as believing the world may be ‘flat,’ is refusing to get with the program, so the narrative goes. He is a stubborn curmudgeon who refuses to comply with a perfectly reasonable vaccine mandate. Same old Kyrie.

But the truth is a lot more complicated than the usual suspects in the mainstream press are portraying it. According to a report by the widely respected sports publication “The Athletic,” Kyrie isn’t refusing to comply because he is against vaccines. He is refusing to play because of millions of Americans who stand to lose their jobs over the unconstitutional vaccine mandates.

“Irving is not anti-vaccine and that his stance is that he is upset that people are losing their jobs due to vaccine mandates,” The Athletic reported, according to its sources.

The Athletic also reported that Irving views the situation as a “grander fight than the one court and Irving is challenging a perceived control of society and people’s livelihood,” the publication’s sources told it.

Irving was recently suspended by the Brooklyn Nets for refusing to comply with the team’s ultimatum, despite a recent court ruling that he could practice with the team.

Brooklyn Nets General Manager Sean Marks announced: “Given the evolving nature of the situation and after thorough deliberation, we have decided Kyrie Irving will not play or practice with the team until he is eligible to be a full participant.”

“Kyrie has made a personal choice, and we respect his individual right to choose. Currently, the choice restricts his ability to be a full-time member of the team, and we will not permit any member of our team to participate with part-time availability,” Marks said. “It is imperative that we continue to build chemistry as a team and remain true to our long-established values of togetherness and sacrifice.”

Thus, even as vaccine companies are shielded from liability, and Kyrie Irving’s age demographic and physical fitness level give him a risk profile for vaccine-induced heart inflammation that is as serious as that of Covid-19 itself, the NBA “owners” are telling the players that they should “sacrifice” their bodies for the greater good.  NBA player Jonathan Isaac, who had tested positive for Covid-19 in the past and thus has natural immunity, gave a similar position as Irving’s as he defended the right for people to control what is going into their own bodies.

“I’m not anti-Vax. I’m not anti-medicine. I’m not anti-science,” Issac said in a Sept. 27 press conference. “I have nothing but the utmost respect for every health care worker in person in Orlando, and all across the world that has worked tirelessly to keep us safe. My mom has worked in healthcare for a really long time. I thank God I’m grateful that I live in a society where vaccines are possible, and we can protect ourselves and have the means to protect ourselves for the first in the first place.”

“I’m not ashamed to say that I’m uncomfortable with taking the vaccine at this time. I think that we’re all different. We all come from different places, we’ve all had different experiences, and hold dear to different beliefs,” he said. “What it is that you do with your body when it comes to putting medicine in there should be your choice, free of the ridicule and the opinion of others.”

Isaac said he believed his antibodies, young age, and high level physical fitness put him in a relatively safe place without the aid of the vaccine. It should be noted that the CDC has admitted that vaccines do not stop the spread, and there were similar viral loads found between the vaccinated and unvaccinated.

“It would decrease my chances of having a severe reaction but it does open me up to the albeit rare chance with the possibility of having an adverse reaction to the vaccine itself,” he said. “I’m hesitant at this time but at the end of the day, I don’t feel that it is anyone’s reason to come out and say well this is why or this is not why it should just be their decision and you know loving your neighbors not just loving those that agree with you or look like you’re moving the same way that you do, it’s loving those who don’t.”

Andrew Wiggins of the Golden State Warriors has faced similar pushback over his personal decision not to initially get the Covid vaccine. However, Golden State Warriors’ ‘woke’ coach Steve Kerr and the team’s owner forced Wiggins to get the jab.

“I guess to do certain stuff, to work and all that, I guess you don’t own your body,” Wiggins said. “That’s what it comes down to. You want to work in society today, I guess they make the rules of what goes into your body and what you do.”

Wiggins had an allergic reaction to Tylenol and had to be prescribed an EpiPen should he get a bad reaction. The stories he has heard about people having bad reactions to vaccines had made him hesitant to get the Covid shots.

“I don’t know what it’s going to do to my body. There’s a lot of stuff. I feel like I could go on for days about why I didn’t want to get it. Most importantly, I don’t know what’s going to happen or what it’s going to do to my body in 10, 15 years, 20 years,” Wiggins said. “What it will do to my kids or my future kids. But I guess it’s something I had to get done.”

On Tuesday, a federal judge issued a preliminary injunction against the State of New York’s enforcement of a vaccine mandate that threatens the mass firings of thousands of health workers and public servants.

The court ruling was announced by the Thomas More Society, which is defending a group of  17 health care workers who object to New York State’s vaccine mandate on religious grounds. Judge David Hurd granted their request for an injunction, which stops the state from enforcing the policy, on equal protection and First Amendment grounds.

“Upon review, plaintiffs have established at this early stage of the litigation that they are likely to succeed on the merits of this constitutional claim,” the judge ruled. Thus, New York’s vaccine mandate is almost certainly unconstitutional.

Sports journalists once complained that people who owned teams were called “owners.” Now, they are applauding teams claiming ownership over their player’s bodies. It is inspiring to watch a few of these NBA players speaking out against this infringement of their rights.

If Kyrie Irving, who stands to lose millions of dollars by refusing to comply with the vaccine mandate is willing to stand up to this unjust system, it will draw more attention to the cause of millions of voiceless Americans who stand to lose their livelihoods over the vaccine mandates.