White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki surprised many with a response to a reporter’s question about requiring guests to prove that they have been vaccinated.

“That’s not the role we’re going to play,” replies @PressSec when asked if the @WhiteHouse will ask those in the building who don’t wear a mask whether they’ve been vaccinated. pic.twitter.com/zhpfHWJL5E

— Steve Herman (@W7VOA) May 21, 2021

“That’s not the role we’re going to play,” Psaki replied. The statement follows upon the White House’s insistence that it will not issue a federal mandate for “vaccine passports.”

“President Joe Biden’s administration had no plans to impose a federal vaccination mandate or database, White House press secretary Jen Psaki confirmed at a Friday press briefing,” the Daily Caller reported last week.

Psaki clarified the White House’s position on the controversial “vaccine passports,” according to a Newsy reported.

.@PressSec on vaccine passports: we are not currently considering federal mandates… Private sector companies may decide that they want to have requirements. Thats up to them. We have no plans to change our approach from the the federal government.

— Kellan Howell (@kellanhowell) May 14, 2021

“We are not currently considering federal mandates… Private sector companies may decide that they want to have requirements,” Psaki said. “Thats up to them. We have no plans to change our approach from the the federal government.”

Beyond the privacy issues that come with tracking whether or not Americans have taken experimental vaccines, such digital “passports” arguably violate the Fifth Amendment’s implied “right to travel.” That is why several states have banned them.

U.S. states that have banned vaccine passports from being impemented, include Florida, Texas, Mississippi, Montana, South Carolina, and Arkansas. In sum, at least 18 states have instituted some kind of ban or limitation on vaccination requirements, according to Becker’s Hospital Review.